Potato Bread (made with raw potatoes)

If you search the world wide web for a potato bread recipe, you will find plenty of recipes using boiled, mashed potatoes. I have one in my recipe collection myself (click here ) and I often use it to recycle leftover mashed potatoes. But have you ever tried raw potatoes in a bread recipe? Well, here it is. The raw and very finely grated potatoes give this bread a unique, tangy flavor and excellent freshness. The addition of whole-grain wheat and rye flour makes the crust chewy and each slice pleasantly satisfying.

Potato Bread (made with raw potatoes)

Recipe by Anna BembryCourse: Breakfast, BrunchCuisine: GermanDifficulty: Medium
Servings

1

loaf
Prep time

10

minutes
Baking time

45

minutes
Resting and Proofing

24

hours

The raw and potatoes give this bread a unique, tangy flavor and excellent freshness. The addition of whole-grain wheat and rye flour makes the crust chewy and each slice pleasantly satisfying.

Ingredients

  • 150 g / 5.3 oz potatoes, raw, peeled and very finely grated into pulp

  • 435 g / 15.3 oz all -purpose wheat flour + extra for dusting

  • 25 g / 0.9 oz whole wheat flour

  • 50 g / 1.8 oz dark rye flour

  • 320 g / 11.8 oz water, cold

  • 1 tablespoon salt

  • a hazelnut-sized ball of fresh baker’s yeast

  • Equipment
  • a large cast-iron pot, Römertopf, or another heat-resistant dish with a lid

Method

  • Prepare the dough: In a large bowl combine the flours and add the finely grated potatoes. From the measured out water set aside about 3 – 4 tablespoons and dissolve the yeast in it. Add salt to the rest of the water, dissolve the salt in it and add to the flour and potato mixture. Finally, add the dissolved yeast. Using your hand combine all ingredients by kneading the dough until it is smooth and slightly sticky. If necessary add a little bit more all-purpose flour. Knead and form the dough into a tight ball then cover the bowl airtight with a lid or aluminum foil (the surface of the dough is not supposed to dry out). Set the dough aside to rest and mature for 24 hours at room temperature (at least 22°C / 72°F).
  • Stretch and fold the dough: During those 24 hours stretch and fold your dough every 8 hours (first time after 8 hours of resting and again after 16 hours of resting). To stretch and fold your dough first dip your hand in water. It will prevent the dough from sticking to your hand. Then push your hand deep under the dough, pull the dough to you and fold it over the rest of the dough. Repeat the process from all sides until the whole dough is folded and lies round and tight in the bowl. After each stretching and folding cover the bowl again and set aside.
  • Form a loaf: Transfer the dough onto a workspace, generously sprinkled with flour, and – depending on what kind of a pot you are using – form a round or oblong loaf and sprinkle it generously with flour. Place the dough, seam side down, in a proofing basket or a bowl lined with a dish towel and generously sprinkled with flour. Cover the basket with a clean dish towel and set aside for 1 hour to proof.
  • Preheat the oven, with the pot in it, to 250°C / 485°F.

  • Take the hot pot out of the oven, let the dough fall out of the basket directly into the pot, cover the pot with the lid, and put it back in the oven. Reduce the heat to 240°C / 465°F and bake for 30 minutes, then take off the lid and bake for another 15 minutes. Remove pot from the oven, take out the bread, and let it cool on a cooling rack before slicing.
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